Home » Emerging Technologies » Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer
Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer
STATUS
Research Prototype
AVAILABILITY
The instrument is available for field campaigns. Transportation and salary costs of JPL provided operators will need to be covered. Not currently available for licensing.
REQUEST PROCEDURE
Contact the individual listed below.
Emerging Technologies
An aircraft based active differential absorption technique for determining changes in the column integrated concentration of carbon dioxide in the the atmosphere. operates at a 2 micron wavelength that enables the column to be weighted close to the surface. Uses nadir pointing lasers reflected off the Earth's surface. Instrument is eye safe at all ranges. Requires a nadir viewing port with a clear aperture of ~ 30 cm diameter. instrument is currently flown on a Twin Otter aircraft but can be adapted to other aircraft. Modular design accomodates easy integration and deintegration (4-6 hours for the Twin Otter). Limited number of aircraft check-out flights and measurement not yet validated against accepted in-situ standards as of 4/8/2007.
CONTACT
Gary Spiers
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
M/S 306-300 4800 Oak Grove Dr. Pasadena CA 91101
(818) 354 7831
gary.spiers@jpl.nasa.gov
SPECIFICATIONS
Developer
Development SectorFed/State Gov
R&D ProgramYes
Years Till Available<3
Investment Required$100k-$1M
Projected ApplicationCarbon Dioxide Sink and Source Location
Unit Cost$1-10M
Key RisksAbility to perform retrievals with the precision required has not yet been demonstrated. Complexity of the ancillary measurements required to enable retrieval.
Ease of UseOther (describe in comments above)
PlatformsAircraft
TRLN/A
REFERENCES
Gary D. Spiers, Sven Geier, Robert T. Menzies, Mark Phillips, “The JPL Laser Absorption Spectrometer” International Laser Radar Conference, Kamakura, Japan (July 2006).
REMARKS
Current aircraft instrument is a first generation instrument but engineered to be robust. Goal of aircraft instrument is to validate the approach for an eventual space-based instrument deployment.
UPDATED ON
18 Nov 2009 08:55