Home » Airborne Measurements » Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor
Airborne Tropospheric Hydrogen Oxides Sensor
STATUS
Operational
AVAILABILITY
ATHOS is currently configured for the NASA DC-8 aircraft. It is available for field studies.
REQUEST PROCEDURE
Please contact William Brune.
Airborne Measurements
ATHOS uses laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure OH and HO2 simultaneously. HO2 is reacted with reagent NO to form OH and is then detected with LIF. Ambient air is pulled by a vacuum pump through a small inlet, up a sampling tube, and into two low-pressure detection cells - the first for OH and the second for HO2. Detection occurs in each cell at the intersection of the airflow, the laser beam, and the detector field-of-view. ATHOS can detect OH and HO2 in clear air and light clouds from Earth's surface to the lower stratosphere.
CONTACT
William Brune
Pennsylvania State University
503 Walker Building University Park, PA 16801
814-865-3286
brune@meteo.psu.edu
SPECIFICATIONS
Manufacturer
Dimensions
Weight
Power Source Type
Inlet Apertures
Heating/Cooling Requirements
Airspeed/Altitude Requirements
Operators Requiredone operator
Ground Requirements
Suitable Platforms
Data System
Measured Parameterhydroxyl (OH) and hydroxyl (HO2) radicals
Measurement Technique
Operational Modecontinuous
Time Resolution20 seconds, although .2 second is possible
Horizontal Resolution
Other Resolution
Precisionlimit-of-detection - OH: 0.01 pptv; HO2: 0.1 pptv
Accuracy32%, 2-sigma
Range
Calibration Method
Limitations
REFERENCES
Faloona, I.C., D. Tan, R.L. Lesher, N.L. Hazen, C.L. Frame, J.B. Simpas, H. Harder, M. Martinez, P. Di Carlo, X.R. Ren, W.H. Brune, 2004: A laser-induced fluorescence instrument for detecting tropospheric OH and HO2: Characteristics and calibration, J. Atmos. Chem., 47, 139-167.
UPDATED ON
3 Sep 2009 13:47