Home » Airborne Measurements » Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE)
Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (LASE)
AVAILABILITY
Currenty available.
REQUEST PROCEDURE
Request by letter or e-mail
Airborne Measurements
LASE is a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system that is suitable for profiling water vapor distribution in the troposphere. It has participated in field experiments over the past year 12 years @ 1 per year. Been used in boundary layer development; convection, storm, and hurricane development; stratosphere-troposphere exchange, atmospheric chemistry, and anthropogenic pollution studies and for comparison with water vapor measurements with other in situ and remote sensors.
CONTACT
Syed Ismail
NASA Langley Research Center
MS 401A NASA Langley Research center Hampton VA 23861
757-864-2719
Syed.Ismail-1@nasa.gov
SECONDARY CONTACT
Richard Ferrare
NASA Langley Research Center
MS 401A NASA Langley Research Center Hampton VA 23681
757-864-9443
r.ferrare @larc.nasa.gov
SPECIFICATIONS
ManufacturerNASA Langley Research Center
Dimensions6'X6'X3'
Weight1650 lb
Power Source Type60 Hz/400 Hz, 5 KW total power.
Inlet Apertures16" nadir and zenith windows
Heating/Cooling Requirements1 KW
Airspeed/Altitude Requirements
Operators Required2
Ground Requirements
Suitable PlatformsNASA DC-8 and P-3
Data SystemDigital Alpha Station 600 based sytem with dual monitors, real-time data analysis and display. 50 GB disk space and tape drive.
Measured Parameterwater vapor mixing ratio, aerosl backsctterand scattering ration, aerosl and cloud extinction, relative humidity (using sonde T profiles), boundary layer height, cloud top height,
Measurement TechniqueDIAL
Operational Modenadir and zenith
Time Resolution1 min (water vapor), 1 s aerosol/cloud
Horizontal Resolution10-20 km (water vapor), 100 m aerosol and cloud
Other ResolutionVertical: 0.2-0.5 km (water vapor), 30 m aerosol
Precision3-5%
Accuracy5-10%
RangeAltitude: 0-12 km (water vapor), 0-25 km aerosol and cloud
Calibration Methodself--using previously measured absorption cross-section
LimitationsCloud attenuation
REFERENCES
1. Browell, E. V., S. Ismail, W. M. Hall, A. S. Moore, Jr., S. A. Kooi, V. G. Brackett, M. B. Clayton, J. D. W. Barrick, F. J. Schmidlin, N. S. Higdon, S. H. Melfi, and D. N. Whiteman, LASE validation experiment, in Advances in Atmospheric Remote Sensing with Lidar, A. Ansmann, R. Neuber, P. Rairoux, and U. Wandinger, eds., pp. 289-295, Springer Verlag, New York, 1997. 2. Ismail, S., E. V. Browell, R. A. Ferrare, S. A. Kooi, M. B. Clayton, V. G. Brackett, and P. B. Russell, LASE measurements of aerosol and water vapor profiles during TARFOX, J. Geophys. Res.,105, 9903-9916, 2000. 3. Ferrare, R. A., E. V. Browell, S. Ismail, et al., Characterization of upper-trosphere water vapor measurements during AFWEX using LASE, J. Atmos. Oceanic technol., 21, 1790-1808, 2004.
UPDATED ON
3 Sep 2009 13:47